ESSAYS


ARTIST'S STATEMENTS

 

 

 

 

The Lovers

by Patricia Piccinini (2011)
 

The Lovers follows on from a number of works that explore the idea of nature rendered in mechanical form. These works wonder at the naturalisation of technology in contemporary life, and imagine a life-cycle for machines that is closer to that of animals. In doing so, it evokes the increasingly ‘natural’ place that technology occupies in our lives, but also the growing role that technology plays in the natural world. In a world where we get our food from the supermarket, the cow becomes a ‘milk machine’ and the milk itself the product of a mechanised process where the animal is just one small biological cog in a much larger aparatus. However, in depicting the scooters as wild animals rather than domesticated ones - deers rather than sheep - the work also suggests a world of technology that is beyond our mastery. I have several motivations for making these works. On one level, I simply love the forms. The sinuous curves and perfect glossy surfaces are the illogical conclusion of contemporary automotive attractiveness but they also evoke the voluptuousness of modernist sculpture. Beyond that, I also feel that these wild machine creatures undercut our basic assumption that technology is always within our control. This idea is at the core of our beliefs about it and is assumed to be true, but I sometime wonder if that is really so. I love the idea that The Lovers is a snapshot from an ecology of mechanical wildlife that we will never see. This particular work has softness and intimacy that contradicts the glossy hardness of the surfaces and materials. The work depicts a couple, suggesting the potential for reproduction, which ultimately denotes independence, a life in which people are no longer necessary.

 

 

 

Interview with The Condition Report by Patricia Piccinini and The Condition report

Just Because Something Is Bad, Doesn't Mean It Isn't Good by Basak Doga Temur

Patricia Piccinini interviewed by Jane Messenger by Jane Messenger

Speculative Fabulations for Technoculture's Generations by Donna Haraway

The Naturally Artificial World by Laura Fernandez Orgaz and Patricia Piccinini

Border Patrol by Stella Brennan

We Are Family: Patricia Piccinini at the 50th Biennale of Venice by Linda Michael

Patricia Piccinini's Offspring by Peter Hennessey

Fast forward: accelerated evolution by Rachel Kent

One Night Love by Nikos Papastergiadis

Autoerotic by Amanda Rowell

One Night Love by Linda Michael

Atmosphere by Juliana Engberg

Biopshere by Edward Colless

Patricia Piccinini: Ethical Aesthetics by Jacqueline Millner

Patricia Piccinini - Early Installations by Peter Hennessey

The NESS Project and the Birth of Truck Babies by Hiroo Yamagata

Some thoughts about Embryo by Patricia Piccinini

The Rookie by Patricia Piccinini

The Shadows Calling by Patricia Piccinini

Meditations on the continuum of vitality by Patricia Piccinini

Six observations about The Skywhale by Patricia Piccinini

Those Who Dream by Night by Patricia Piccinini

The Fitzroy Series by Patricia Piccinini

Eulogy by Patricia Piccinini

The Lovers by Patricia Piccinini

The Welcome Guest by Patricia Piccinini

The Observer by Patricia Piccinini

Aloft by Patricia Piccinini

Balasana by Patricia Piccinini

The Gathering by Patricia Piccinini

Perhaps the World is Fine Tonight by Patricia Piccinini

Bottom Feeder by Patricia Piccinini

Not Quite Animal by Patricia Piccinini

The Long Awaited by Patricia Piccinini

The Foundling by Patricia Piccinini

In Another Life by Patricia Piccinini

Big Mother by Patricia Piccinini

Bodyguard by Patricia Piccinini

Sandman by Patricia Piccinini

The Leather Landscape by Patricia Piccinini

The Young Family by Patricia Piccinini

Still Life With Stem Cells by Patricia Piccinini

Swell by Patricia Piccinini

The Breathing Room by Patricia Piccinini

Truck Babies by Patricia Piccinini